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 Discussion 1 ( Week 6)

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156575



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Join date : 02/04/2012

PostSubject: Re: Discussion 1 ( Week 6)   Mon Apr 02, 2012 11:31 am

jus a general knowledge fact to know: American Sign Language is the third most widely used language in the United States.

this being said ASL is a complex system of its own and it is distinct from English itself as it has its own grammar systems etc.

While we would raise our voice or pitch when asking a question, deaf people would raise their eyebrows. therefore they have much richer facial expressions which is to their advantage.

deaf people who learn ASL are just as capable as able bodied 'normal' us.
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fionaS
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PostSubject: Discussion 1 ( Week 6)   Mon Apr 02, 2012 11:34 am

Example of Independent Sign Language is actually American Sign Language.
ASL, being a linguistically complete language, is the predominant form of sign used among American Deaf. it is a form of manual communication in which hands, limbs, head, facial expression and body language are used to communicate a visual-spatial language without sound.
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sharfina156670



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PostSubject: chapter 2   Thu Apr 05, 2012 6:35 am

Hi everyone! albino its me again..ive been away for quite some times i guess! ehehe.. Razz Razz

Now..get back to our discussion..
In addition of ISL, children who are exposed to a signed language from birth will acquire this sign language well , just as hearing children acquire their native spoken language.

The acquisition of non-manual features follows an interesting pattern. It is when a word that always has a particular non-manual feature associated with it (such as a wh- question word) is learned, the non-manual aspects are attached to the word but don’t have the flexibility associated with adult use. At a certain point the non-manual features are dropped and the word is produced with no facial expression. After a few months the non-manuals reappear, this time being used the way adult signers would use them.

Dont you think so? flower
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eyla fazila



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PostSubject: Re: Discussion 1 ( Week 6)   Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:19 am

hand configuration, formation of shapes by the hand, place of articulation: where in space the hand is formed and movement: how the moves are three basic components of ISL.
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akram hanafi



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PostSubject: Independent Sign Language    Mon Apr 16, 2012 11:12 am

is a type of sign language that does not depend on ordinary language. Unlike Speech-based Sign Language, ISL does not represent spoken words (spelling, order of words & morphemes); instead it has developed their own words and grammatical systems.

I will be highlighting the characteristic of ISL in terms of its word structure (morphology). ISL is influenced by 3 main components that is able to change the meaning or morphological structure of words:
1. hand configuration = the shape that the hand forms
2. place of articulation = where in space the hand is formed
3. movement = how the hand moves

Therefore, the derivations of a word (from noun to adjective, from noun to verbs, present tense to past tense, etc.) can be changed by changing any of those components mentioned above.


FOR EXAMPLE:

To change the verb 'teach' to the noun 'teacher, an addition form (handshape) is added to the end of the original sign for 'teach'.

To change the verb 'teach' to 'teaching', the sign for 'teach' is repeated and so the movement happens twice.

So,
in the case of 'teacher', a handshape is added.
in the case of 'teaching', a movement is added.
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janicelim



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PostSubject: Characteristics of ISL   Mon May 14, 2012 11:24 am

The sign of an Independent Sign Language (ISL) can be analyzed into three basic components:

(1) hand configuration: the shape that the hand forms;

(2) place of articulation: where in space the hand is formed;

(3) movement: how the hand moves.

American Sign Language(ASL) is one of the examples of ISL.

American Sign Language (ASL) is a sign language, a language in which the hands, arms, head, facial expression and body language are used to speak without sound. ASL is not related to English, and features an entirely different grammar and vocabulary.
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shaida



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PostSubject: ISL Characteristics   Mon May 21, 2012 8:28 am

There are 3 basic components for ISL which are handshape, hand's movement and where in space the hand is formed. For example American Sign Language (ASL). In terms of word structure, word order in ASL is relatively free, wit an unmarked Subject-Verb-Object order. Other than that, ASL cannot be used simultaneously with speech. It also has a separate and distinct grammar and syntax from English.
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